What’s in your Witch-kit?

While I was taking a break from writing, I worked on some other aspects of my life and practice. One of those was reorganizing my Craft supplies – putting herbs into (labelled) storage containers, sorting candles, and generally moving things around so that I can get at what I want more easily.

Along the way, I’ve selected a handful of materials to put in a small cabinet – about the size of a medicine cabinet – which I’m going to hang near my altar to have at hand all the time. I debated quite a bit about what to put in there, so I’m going to share my list here and ask in turn: What’s in your Witch-kit?

What do you use on a daily or near-daily basis? What are the things that you turn to most frequently, both for planned and unplanned situations?

Mine has:

Two small candle-holders and an assortment of candles: several colors each of chime candles, Hannukah candles, and birthday candles

Small jars of some herbs: lavender, rosemary, juniper, juniper berries, holly berries (may switch this out for something more seasonal in the spring), chamomile, tobacco

Tiny (2ml) bottles of oils: peppermint, lavender, cedarwood

Tray holding pointed quartz crystal, a couple stones from significant places, and tumbled stones: clear, smoky, and rose quartz, fluorite, selenite, jet, amber, hematite, snowflake obsidian, malachite, garnet, amethyst, tiger’s eye, citrine, and lapis

Small boxes of stick incense: pine, cedarwood, sandalwood, amber, jasmine, vanilla, lavender, cinnamon

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About Literata

Literata is a Wiccan priestess and writer. She edited Crossing the River: An Anthology in Honor of Sacred Journeys, and her poetry, rituals, and nonfiction have appeared in works such as Mandragora, Unto Herself, and Anointed as well as multiple periodicals. Literata has presented rituals and workshops at Sacred Space conference, Fertile Ground Gathering, and other mid-Atlantic venues. Literata offers healing and divination services as well as customized life-cycle rituals. She is currently completing her doctoral dissertation in history with the support of her husband and four cats.
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4 Responses to What’s in your Witch-kit?

  1. Bookloverlori says:

    I don’t think this counts as a kit, but I never go anywhere without my relaxation essential oil blend. I’ve been known to douse myself and the kids in it, particularly on long car trips to Florida or before bed when we’re all still wound up. I also keep some in a mini-crockpot with a little water, in the kitchen, to heat up on days when I’m feeling particularly stressful, which is just about every day. I also rely heavily on cinnamon oil. I don’t know why, but using cinnamon oils in diffusers around my house always makes me feel better.

    I am interested in learning more about what candles can do. Now that I can actually have a candle in my house, with *minimal* fear of my house burning down, I would like to learn more. The older kids are very into incense and if I could find some natural incense that serves a useful purpose, I would be burning that sucker daily!

    I’ll keep checking back for other comments on what people are using, and hopefully they’ll list why they are using it. : )

  2. Ann The Mad says:

    I was thinking of listing what was *actually* in my Witch Kit the last time I had and used a Witch Kit, but then figured that probably wouldn’t be very helpful. 🙂

  3. Ann The Mad says:

    My witch kit was a willow picnic-type basket. When I last opened it, it contained:

    The combination for the Pagan Students’ Group storage locker, scribbled (incorrectly) on the inside of the basket lid
    A heavy blue ceramic wineglass (traveling chalice) wrapped in several large tie-dye scarves that smell like rosemary oil (traveling altar cloths)
    6 beeswax votive candles, one with a chunk cut out of the side where I needed some beeswax to stick something together with.
    Several salt packets from McDonalds
    Directions to Jeff and Linda’s house
    Two matchboxes with no matches in them.
    A piece of gray flannel that smells like rosemary oil, wrapped around 75 cards from the Hansen-Roberts Tarot deck.
    Three glass vials of powdered incense (Goddess-related, protection/healing, and something else I think I liked because it was green); all scents are now indistinguishable from rosemary oil.
    A large piece of aluminum foil wrapped around about half a pound of charcoal dust (formerly: charcoal disks for powdered incense.)
    My good, sharp embroidery scissors
    Footie socks that smell like rosemary oil
    Band-Aids
    A little wooden image of the Goddess that I carved from a piece of board, and which needed to be stuck to the table with a lump of beeswax or it tipped over.
    Two packets of Brown Sugar Cinnamon Pop Tarts, packaged for individual sale
    The scabbard for my athame.
    A mix tape of Pagan filk, smeared with something oily.
    Rubber bands.
    Rosemary oil, in a small bottle with a broken stopper.
    The summer of 1992.
    $4.39 in small bills and change, plus two MBTA subway tokens
    Three or four smooth, round stones.

    • Literata says:

      Very interesting! Thank you for sharing it after all.

      The idea of a portable kit is of course different from my little cabinet. If I made a portable kit, I think it would include:

      salt packets (I know more than one person who has used these as an easy portable source of salt!) set of stones representing Elements and deity joss sticks – lavender, cedarwood lighter birthday candles or chime candles, small fireproof plate and poster sticky-tac to put them on small bowl for water

      Come to think of it, this plus a couple of other items – small representations of deities, a few more candles, mini plate and cup for ritual meal – was basically what I carried when I was setting up a portable altar on a military base.

      Of course, for open Sabbat rituals, I’ve also found myself packing two big plastic bins of stuff – that’s when I’m carrying around loose incense and charcoal and the kitchen sink, I mean, ritual props.

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